Crossing the Bar

There are pithy phrases in Tennyson’s classic, “Crossing the Bar” – –

“may there be no moaning of the bar, When I put out to sea.” – – “Moaning of the bar.”  Wow.  Waves crashing against a sandbar bring to mind that brilliant beauty we all love at the Coast.  But in this connotation, it’s rather eerie.  Tennyson considered what it would be like when he dies: “May there be no moaning of the bar.”  My vulgar translation might be, “When my time comes, I don’t want to have bucked against You.  I don’t want a shameful approach that sounds like moaning!  Will you change me, please? And keep me out of the way of what You’re changing?”

 “I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crossed the bar.” – – Alfred had hope of finally meeting his Pilot.  I dare say, none but those declared righteous through Christ’s blood could just chirpily sing through this line of poetry.  The amazing Creation around us proves God: it’s completely insane to continue running headlong in the other direction.

Even as Christians: Would we indeed be happy to see God show up at the sandbar today?  What are each of us doing, saying, thinking, or ignoring that grieves Him?  He loves us with an everlasting love.  Why is it that we (even intermittently) treat Him like that?  Each of us must ask these questions all the time:

~~ Am I bitter against anyone?

~~ Do I have a pet little sin?

~~ What am I supposed to be doing?

~~ Am I going along with things—even religious things—inconsistent with God’s Word and His character?

~~ If the car crashed tonight, would there be a “moaning of the bar”?

Matt. 25:6-9  Behold, the bridegroom! Come out to meet him.’ Then all those virgins rose and trimmed their lamps. The foolish said to the prudent, ‘Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.’ But the prudent answered, ‘No, there will not be enough for us and you too…

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